Italian Language Dialects > Tuscan, Neapolitan, Sicilian, Venetian & more

Italian Language Dialects

If you have never been to Italy you might not know that if we change city or region we don’t sound all exactly the same because we have many dialects.

Yes, if you go to Rome and you listen carefully to people on the streets you might not recognise many words because of their beautiful “declinations” of the Italian language.

Dialects are not written languages but they are used a lot during informal chats between people coming from the same city. Sometimes it happens that italians from different regions can’t understand each other at all, but don’t worry, everyone in Italy knows how to master the “official” italian language!

Perhaps you don’t know that the italian language as you know it is based on the literary florentine used around 1300. So, Florence is the best city to learn italian, isn’t it? 😉

Let’s see some of the most famous Italian dialects!

Tuscan

In Tuscany (especially in Florence) we are very famous because we usually aspirate the “c”’s.  Try to say “La Coca Cola con la cannuccia corta corta” without any “c”, it’s quite challenging! We also shorten the infinite of verbs, for example “andare” becomes “anda’”.

Watch this funny video to understand better the differences between Tuscan cities.

Neapolitan

The neapolitan is recognised by UNESCO as a real language and you can hear it in the Naples’ area and in the Campania region. It’s very difficult to understand and it differs from the italian language because of its Greek origins.

If you want to learn a few words, don’t miss this video with the protagonists of the italian tv series “Gomorra”.

Sicilian

Sicily is a fantastic island full of traditions and habits which speaks a language made of many influences. Due to its strategic location Latins, Greeks, Arabians and many more ancient civilisations generated a mixed language that nowadays is still studied.

Find the differences between italian and sicilian, we bet that you’ll find some.

Venetian

Also in the north of Italy there are many dialects which can be impossible to understand and one of them is the venetian for sure! If you listen carefully you’ll discover that often the vowels are cut off. “Cane” become “can” or “pane” become “pan”.

If you’re curious about some venetian common sayings you should watch this video (FYI: lots of swear words in it).

Ligurian

The Ligurian dialect is spoken in the region of Liguria and it’s one of the most recognisable dialect of the north of Italy. There are many variation of this dialect but the most important is the one spoken in Genova for sure. Did you know that “Genova” is also called “Zena”?

You should listen to the songs of Fabrizio De Andrè, a famous genoese songwriter that used the dialect in many of his songs.

Sardinian

In the Sardinia island the spoken language is independent from the other neolatin languages spoken in Italy and it is the most conservative between all the latin derived languages. This makes the Sardinian a real language!

Did you know that in the city of Alghero (north-west of Sardinia) you can hear an arcaic variation of the Catalan? That’s because of a Spanish immigration occurred in the late 1300.

Want to hear some “Sardo”? Watch this video!

Apulian

If you go to Puglia to discover its beaches or the fantastic food you’ll hear for sure its dialect that is often incomprehensible to most of the italians. Dialects of Puglia are divisible in two, and both of them originate from latin. They mostly come from the city of Bari and the Salento area. Try to say “Salento: lu’ sole, lu’ mare, lu’ ientu”, this means “Salento: the sun, the sea, the wind” and it’s a very common quote related to the Salento area.

A funny italian comedian can show you how different the Apulian dialects are.

Map of italian dialects

Are you curious about the other dialects and laguages of Italy? Let’s see this map together, can you count them all?

Source: Sima Brankov

Do you have a favourite italian dialect?

You can choose yours through this funny play by Enrico Brignano, an italian comedian.

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